Rockhauler57



























  1. Ordered mine Oct 9th and received it Dec 9th, just over 2 weeks ago.

  2. If you’re willing to pay again and bring your documents again… just “lose” your license. You don’t need a whole bureaucratic process.

  3. Your current DL photo is on file & in the system. That's the same photo that will be on your 'replacement' license. You don't get to decide to take a new pic just for a 'lost/replacement' license. They use the pic on file.

  4. Any time I’ve gotten a new license they make me take a new picture. For every duplicate I have ever taken. I have to get a new license bc I dropped it in the fryer at work, and I’m dreading going to the dmv because of this.

  5. I can understand new pics on the 4 year license renewal, but every time I've gone in for a corrected license (address change) or a duplicate license (lost) they wouldn't allow a new pic to be taken. They would just use the existing photo on file. Perhaps certain IL DMV workers or different locations do things a bit different than others.

  6. the Prosecutor's press confrerence is starting now, will we finally find out who that guy that was sitting to the left of DA Opper is?

  7. He reminded me of the "I want pancakes" guy in the movie Fargo. lol

  8. Two very different products for distinctly different uses, so your survey is very flawed. WD-40 is not a lubricant. It's mainly a water displacer. PB Blaster is a very low viscosity penetrating lubricant.

  9. Keep in mind that any color codes I state are for US only.

  10. Also, never trust colors and test for voltage before puting any wires in your mouth

  11. I just saw the additional pic you posted of the nearby building demolition/re-construction, and I believe Pearsepicoetc is on the correct path, regarding the source. I also recommend trying to keep your apartment widows closed and sealed for a few days if possible along with a thorough cleanup inside.

  12. You (and the others) are correct. Here's the patent, dated June 14 1881 (ie "pat June 14 81")

  13. That patent appears to have absolutely nothing at all to do with the OP's item.

  14. It looks similar to a kerosene lamp wall bracket, but typically the ring would be spaced further out from the wall bracket piece itself, to give more clearance to the wall.

  15. Exactly, the "spur" is what it's driving me crazy. I'll have to try and determine if the "spur" extended any further

  16. I'm 99% certain that the spur consisted of far more originally, just by how the end eroded to a tapered point.

  17. Definitely a home-brew creation and with that one wear mark on the inner side of the outer crossbar, I'd say it was used to pull or attach/hold something from that direction.

  18. 2008 chevy cobalt. that $400 included the front brakes and shocks. i guess my sway bar snapped when they were trying to fix the brakes too so that was an extra 60 to get a new one

  19. OK, since that $400 included front brake parts, shocks, etc, then that sounds more correct. Sway bars don't usually snap, but they might mean the link rods on each end that's attached to the sway bar. Those links and bushings are frequent replacement items.

  20. yeah the whole thing was a mess but the price wasn’t horrible. hopefully i get a good estimate when i call some places tomorrow

  21. Anyone who gives you an estimate without pulling the drums off first is just throwing out a totally random wild guess that isn't one bit accurate.

  22. Hard to believe there would be a septic tank right next to the well, though?

  23. Any septic tank certainly wouldn't have a plywood top and not that close to a well.

  24. Well, 1 Sq ft of 1/2" steel weighs 20.42 lbs. So 40 lbs seems reasonable to me.

  25. It could be. I had thought its total area would be less than 2 square feet at first, and also considered the 4 number cutouts would take a 'somewhat' considerable portion of material out of the weight.

  26. Can you give the thickness of the steel used in the 'triangle' part?

  27. That one appears to be made out of metal, correct?

  28. I could see that one coming, especially with that volume, speed of discharge, & fresh masonry work. Even if they let the masonry age/cure, that entire shell should have had a 1/4" plywood full wrap around the outside and heavily steel-banded. That, plus pour the top with less slump & far slower.

  29. What part of an alignment would be out to wear the inside siping of the tire first/more? That wouldn't be possibly...overinflation?

  30. Excessive toe-out would do that rather quickly. Excessive negative camber would do it at a slower/gradual rate.

  31. To further clarify, in case you may not know what these terms mean, when viewed from the front of the vehicle, excessive toe-out would be when the front of the tires are angled slightly outward and not parallel.

  32. Then remain with your present inexperienced views.

  33. No shocker that you're only proving how truly clueless you are to the job and all that I've experienced. As soon as I saw the words internet tough guy I knew you truly don't have a clue.

  34. That being the case, then all you'd need is to dig out along one side, lay a short 4x4 on that side of grass as a fulcrum, and pry each section out with a long heavy pry bar.

  35. Your pics don't show the most important part, which is how thick they are.

  36. The stacking of the drywall would have zero effect on that slab, being as that took place 2 months after the slab was placed. After 14 days alone, the slab has approx 90% of its full strength and approx 99% of its full strength at 28 days.

  37. It sure appears to be cut limestone, which is exactly what our fireplace mantle was built with, as well as all the sills for each outside doorway.

  38. “Foot on the gas pedal” then? If I’m not accelerating, then I’m decelerating.

  39. Well, one could have his foot "on" the gas pedal and be accelerating, decelerating, or cruising with no change in torque/speed. It also matters if there's a change in grade/slope of the road. Your rpms indicated far more 'cruising' than accelerating.

  40. True. I’ve only noticed this on the highway, generally flat road (so cruising), but I’ll check again if it changes with road grade (if I can find any local roads where I can get up to fifth gear).

  41. My main point in all of this is in trying to determine if there's a 'forward' load on the trans gears & drivetrain that figures in, or a 'reverse' coast/decel load on the gears/drivetrain when this happens or if it's even enough load to actually be part of the issue. I have no ideas mainly because the audio is so weak, distant, & unclear in order to determine if it's a whine, whistle, or some other sound.

  42. It depends on the 'flex' you're trying to establish.

  43. Yep that’s be crazy, get it shipped in mixers and rent a line pump. A job this size requires a crew. Excavating out a basement on an existing building is extremely labour intensive. And 2000sf is a big project. Especially if you’re only looking at 3-4 ft of clearance to work with. It’s a laborious expensive project.

  44. I don't think he's saying that at all. He already has a 3'-4' deep existing 'basement' below a 2000 sq ft wood/timber floor that is rotten. That wood floor is the 'ceiling' of the existing basement, which he intends to fill with dirt to pour a 2000 sq ft slab. He wont be working in a 4' tall confined space, as in a crawlspace or excavating. Just ripping the wood floor out & filling in.

  45. Yes, you are correct. It's an old bank barn that was moved to it's current location around 60 years ago. I think the old location had a full basement under it, but the new one doesn't. Very low ceiling height and there was no way to access the basement, until I cut a hole in the floor. The ceiling of the basement has very old light bulbs on it still.

  46. You'd still have a small gold mine there if you could salvage & plane down even less than half of that timber and Chestnut, provided the number that wasn't submerged or rotten to the core.

  47. Well I never specifically stated that pep boys said it was the struts that were the problem if that’s what you’re saying they just told me it was a damaged suspension. But of course. They didn’t tell me EXACTLY what needed to be replaced. I tried researching what parts compose a suspension system but All i found are videos teaching how to change struts, hence why i mentioned them. I really have no idea what else would need to be replaced

  48. I realized that, but for them to tell you that you had a damaged suspension or bad suspension parts, but not identifying WHICH parts were a problem, that tells me they were talking without really knowing anything. Basic suspension parts (steering parts included) are ball joints, inner/outer tie rod ends, control arms, springs/struts, wheel bearings, etc. There are very simple ways to check whether each of these parts are bad or good, but it's far easier to show someone how to do it than to explain how to do it for someone who has no experience in it.

  49. Not sure how 'thin' your residue is, but we always have used white vinegar (as Mixitupher mentioned) to clean some pretty heavily crusted concrete tools.

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