No-Pair74


























  1. Yellowstone is our oldest national park, and one of the most popular, receiving close to five million visitors in an average year. On my own first visit, back in 2015, I thought I knew what to expect, but this place is so genuinely other-worldly that there’s simply no appropriate frame of reference. More simply put: there’s no other place like it, anywhere on the planet, so until you’ve seen it for yourself, you have no idea what you’re missing!

  2. Thanks for the comment, I don't believe I edited this heavily. And even if I did, art is subjective. Here's the RAW photo -

  3. You're absolutely correct about art being subjective. I love bright colors, personally, and I think your photo is terrific, the Raw version as well as the edited version. The critics who think it's over-edited or too heavily saturated should take note of all those awards and upvotes. Clearly, this photo was noticed, and appreciated by a significant number of people. Speaking from experience, it would be tough to do much better!

  4. Don’t even think about it. Being caught with a gun, or even a single loose bullet in your vehicle, will get you a prison sentence in Mexico.

  5. I drove to the Yucatan and back a few years ago, and it was some of the best fun I've had in my entire life. I wouldn't do it alone, because that makes you even more of a target. Stick to the toll roads (the cuotas), they're expensive, but better maintained and far more frequently patrolled. Don't drive at night, and avoid that route along the Gulf coast. Monterrey south to Puebla is much safer. Beware the topes, speed bumps; they are EVERYWHERE, and if you hit them too fast, you'll blow a tire (or worse). You'll need insurance (seperate for each country), and you should study all the regulations carefully. Knowing some basic Spanish is mission critical.

  6. They're lying, and what's worse, they KNOW they're lying.

  7. The Tumacácori National Historical Park is centered on the partially restored ruin of a Spanish mission of the same name, located just north of Nogales, on the Arizona border with Mexico. The earliest incarnation of the mission was founded by the Jesuit Father Eusebio Kino more than 300 years ago, making it one of the earliest inroads by Europeans into the territory now known as Arizona. Father Kino was a busy guy, founding no less than 24 missions and chapels in southern Arizona and northern Mexico during a time when renegade Apaches ruled most of the area, making the priesthood a very dangerous profession. Mission San José de Tumacácori was in use until 1840, while another of Father Kino’s missions, San Xavier del Bac, which is closer to Tucson, is still actively in use by the mostly Native American community in the surrounding area. The mission church at San Xavier is widely considered the finest example of Spanish Mission architecture in the United States.

  8. The Tumacácori National Historical Park is centered on the partially restored ruin of a Spanish mission of the same name, located just north of Nogales, on the Arizona border with Mexico. The earliest incarnation of the mission was founded by the Jesuit Father Eusebio Kino more than 300 years ago, making it one of the earliest inroads by Europeans into the territory now known as Arizona. Father Kino was a busy guy, founding no less than 24 missions and chapels in southern Arizona and northern Mexico during a time when renegade Apaches ruled most of the area, making the priesthood a very dangerous profession. Mission San José de Tumacácori was in use until 1840, while another of Father Kino’s missions, San Xavier del Bac, which is closer to Tucson, is still actively in use by the indigenous community in the surrounding area. The mission church at San Xavier is widely considered the finest example of Spanish Mission architecture in the United States.

  9. I’m retired now, but when I was working, I had a job that split my time between Phoenix and Washington DC, so I became very familiar with the joys of rush hour commuting in both cities. HOV lanes are a great concept, but if they’re not enforced, they’re a joke, and the way I read these comments, if you’re naive enough to follow the rules here, the joke’s on you! Our HOV program doesn’t promote carpooling; instead, it promotes entitled scofflaws.

  10. This exact same model of stove was in the kitchen of the house we bought in 1982. We're still living in that house, and we're still using the stove.

  11. I'm 72, and I have two grandkids of my own.

  12. No--it was a little town called Virginia, north of Jacksonville.

  13. A heads up, the photo in the first link of the "The twin pillars of Spider Rock" (which is a phenomenal shot by the way) links to a photo of a toucan.

  14. Hey, thanks for pointing that out. It's all better now...

  15. They permit bison hunting outside the park?

  16. Mormon Row is a dirt road that runs parallel to the most picturesque segment of the Teton Range, at just the right distance for photographs. The mountains are west of the road, so if you’re out there at dawn, the sun comes up behind you, illuminating those craggy peaks and their pockets of ice, making them sparkle like diamonds in a regal crown. If you’re really lucky, there might be some bison grazing in the foreground, the entire scene glowing with the golden light of the sunrise.

  17. We took a family trip to Nogales on the Mexican border, and my Dad bought me the whole get-up, down to the chaps and spurs.

  18. Colter Bay is a developed area on the eastern shore of Jackson Lake, the largest lake in Grand Teton National Park. There is a picturesque marina, backed by stunning views of Mt. Moran and the Teton Range, as well as a campground, dining and lodging options, several hiking trails, and a National Park Visitor Center. It’s a great place to watch the sun go down, and an even better place to watch it come up again!

  19. A rafting trip that runs the entire 270 mile length of the Grand Canyon is an experience beyond compare. It takes 14 days (or more) on the smaller paddle-powered boats, or as few as 8 days on the larger motorized pontoon rafts. Every one of those days is action packed, filled with adventures and whitewater rapids, with breathtaking scenery around every glorious curve of the mighty Colorado River.

  20. Nikon F, purchased new at one of those New York City camera stores in 1971, a huge splurge, but well worth it; I traveled the world with that camera. I've since gone through three DSLR's and a mirrorless Sony, and even though I'll never revert back to working with film, I still have that Nikon F. It will always be one of my most prized possessions.

  21. Olden Camera. Back in that era (half a century ago!?), before the internet, when the only mass advertising for camera equipment was those two-page spreads (like Olden Camera) in the back of Popular Photography. In 1970, that place was the ultimate.

  22. This carving is located in the San Agustin Archaeological Park, and it's just one of many monumental sculptures in a fairly large preserve. I've been there twice, so I know a bit about the place. Those sharp teeth are a common theme, and represent the jaguar, an important deity in their animistic religion. The jaguar cult was widespread in the northern Andean highlands, appearing at about the same time as maize agriculture, dual aspects of Mesoamerican influence in the South American mainland.

  23. Over the last ten years or so, Antelope Canyon, the Navajo Tribal Park located on the outskirts of Page, Arizona, has risen from relative obscurity to become one of the most popular destinations in the Southwest. The primary driver behind the exponential increase in visitor numbers was social media, mostly Instagram: everybody who is anybody has racked up a perfect selfie in this almost mystical space, with a backdrop of swirling orange sandstone. Those who manage to schedule their visit during the right time of year, at the right time of day get a bonus: magical beams of light, slanting down from the crack in the roof of the slot canyon, adding that much more pizazz to their photographs.

  24. If you’re traveling across New Mexico on Interstate 10, take US 180 north from Deming as far as NM 61, and a couple of miles beyond that intersection, you’ll find yourself in the City of Rocks. The main attraction at this little known location is a wild display of standing stones: massive volcanic boulders as much as 40 feet tall, carved by the elements over millions of years into an extraordinary variety of shapes and poses. There’s a cool campground with some of the campsites nestled among the rock formations, and there are hiking trails. Other popular activities include birding, stargazing, and rock climbing (free climbing only).

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