ExultantGitana





























  1. In Australia it can be called the dunny. Possibly a shortening of dunneken, meaning shithouse.

  2. We were wondering about the name Dunkin Duncan in light of dunnekin idk 🤷🏽‍♀️

  3. The best I can think of is "shithouse" as a synonym for outhouse, or "pisser" or "shitter" or "crapper" for an indoor bathroom. Definitely not polite terms though.

  4. Wiktionary tells me that the whole influence of the stars thing is from Old French. The Latin word simply refers to a 'flowing in' related to 'fluvius' meaning 'river'.

  5. I am from west coast and have lived in the mid-west, south, and way up northwest and rarely heard it - maybe it's a time period thing too?

  6. No, not tan necessarily and def not perpetually. It's an undertone and it is greenish. It's like looking dark underneath but not always or necessarily actually being dark. I'm olive, have semitic & roman lines, I do tan easily (as well as burn, that's another convo haha), but if I'm not in the sun much I'm somewhat of a lighter dark complexion but not much. If one has spent most of their time among only northern Europeans, you'll see it in many Norwegians, too. If you've been around many different ethnicities, you'll have seen a myriad of olive complected ppl.

  7. You refer to your ethnicity/ancestry as "Roman"? I thought the Roman (Italic-Latin) ethnic group essentially stopped existing during the 5th century (approx). Mainly due to immigration and changing culture. Basically they just became part of other groups.

  8. They are all very handsome...they are actors after all! 😄

  9. Not all actors are handsome. I am living proof of that 🤣

  10. Funny... but yeah, in this case, in these roles, supposed to be attractive. I watch a lot of movies and such from other countries and there are so many types of actors and pretty or not, they fit their roles. You're right. What have you been in?

  11. I shared this with my family last night when one of my kids grabbed a Manila envelope for smth for school! Good stuff!

  12. But cul/o (which is not vulgar in every Romance language, by the way), means simply, the end of, bottom of, butt of, tail end of, back end of.... so, even tho it's fun to turn everything into something silly vulgar, language is just simple, descriptive and not a big deal. But yes, clever of Tolkien, Bag End. There is a book store in my town called Book End. A hearkening to The Shire and book ends at the same time.

  13. I get why you'd want to name it cul, yes, but why sac (bag)?

  14. It's not about how it translates literally. It rarely ever is. It may mean literally what we think it does in English but there is literal translation and figurative. Figurative translation is the sense or the spirit or the essence of the verbiage. The meaning in light of what I just said is just, street without exit or dead end or no outlet. It just means the end of whatever... it is sexualized because that's just what humans do especially when they think in literal terms or concepts. I am not sure if I'm explaining myself well, but I hope so. Peace

  15. But cul/o (which is not vulgar in every Romance language, by the way), means simply, the end of, bottom of, butt of, tail end of, back end of.... so, even tho it's fun to turn everything we possibly can into something silly vulgar, language is just simple, descriptive and not a big deal. Regarding The Hobbit, indeed clever of Tolkien, Bag End. There is a book store in my town, Jacksonville NC, USA, called Book End. A hearkening to The Shire and book ends at the same time.

  16. Both versions mean the same thing, as it were, though one of the earliest citations from 1538 has it so: "a man can not have his cake and eat his cake".

  17. I say it is only because it's regarding word origins, it's also borrowing, creole/pidgin - others will correct my misinfo if necessary, but yeah, it's a surface concept of etymology.

  18. You know, on another sub someone was asking about "don" and "doff" - do on and do off - like a hat - I bring it up because it is just that language is sort of a living organism and flexes with its use by living beings who are creative and such. I have no answer here, just an observation.

  19. I’m observing that I can hardly keep up. Thank goodness for urban dictionary

  20. I could only find "doff" which apparently is a contraction of "do off," meaning, take off, opposite of "don," contraction of "do on," put on! Amazing!

  21. Compare scale to scallop - same root. And people used shells to drink out of - contain items for weighing, containers.

  22. Oh, I thought you all were talking about Vikings proper. We stopped watching Valhalla. Her role was partly why.

  23. Never said that. If one really wants to know something, one asks questions and has a discussion.

  24. TIL that this meaning of ‘reck’ is related to that giant family of ‘reg’ cognates (straighten, rule, etc).

  25. Ooh that would be interesting to hear because I cannot imagine how it would sound. Only thing that comes to mind is breathing out the /w/ because otherwise it seems the /r/ would eat it up. ?

  26. So as someone who was an overachiever in school and now having no prospects as an adult you could say I am deciduous.

  27. 😁 This might be the best, or my favorite, sub-reddit ever! I'm in love. Yuppers!

  28. Yes! I've come to the conclusion that even the most honest, well meaning can get pulled into the machine. But I do think there are honest ones. We just don't hear about them. Being unremarkable is often a sign of good, like in medical imaging results or lab work!

  29. All I see too is from Jekyll and Hyde, that life was stringent and needed to be controlled by reading religious texts. But also, there is a candy called divinity and a good recipe prevents one from making a bad, dry, batch. I don't know! I will look more later - hopefully I remember to. By the way, I read religious texts too but because they are beautiful and freeing. Curious funny.

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