meirl

  1. Thanks for the correct spelling. And his work is amazing. Go see them in person. And note he was the first to do something like this. It’s standard now because he was so good at it.

  2. I can’t remember the details but an experiment was done where children’s paintings were hung in an art gallery labeled as a noted artist’s work. The reviews explained the complicated psychological meanings of the works as I recall. Later it was revealed they were just children’s drawings. Humans are capable of finding meaning in anything.

  3. There have been other studies done on this too. In this one it was found that both art students and students with no artistic background preferred abstract art made by professional artists (including Cy Twombly) over those made by children, even when the professional work was labeled as a child’s work and a child’s work was labeled as a professional’s work.

  4. That...is literally the point of art. It doesn't make this art, or the kid's art, any less meaningful if the intent wasn't there if someone else is capable of looking at the art and having a reaction.

  5. I mean isn't that kind of the point? I know much of modern art looks like scribbles and childrens drawings but they still make people feel.

  6. This is why I used to HATE teachers who would try to have us dissect the "meaning" of artwork or books. Like I am an artist and a writer, not everything I create has SoMe HiDdEn MeAnInG, and trying to find a hidden meaning in every piece of art is just elitist bullshit. Unless an artist has told me the meaning behind their color choices or brush strokes, trying to somehow dissect it and give it meaning is just making up nonsense.

  7. There was a study done where children’s art and contemporary abstract art were presented to people & they had to guess which was done by a child. The consensus found that you can tell the difference, as participants picked correctly.

  8. One could argue there is complex psychological meaning behind a lot of children's art. But, not likely what people were "seeing."

  9. That's a great way to question what art is. That is the whole point of unconventional art. There is some good abstract art out there.

  10. I'm thoroughly convinced that so much of modern art is celebrated because there's a subset of creative people with no talent except to invent meaning in a work and this lets them be the closest thing they can to an artist themselves.

  11. But most minimal work doesn't have a meaningful explanation so that doesn't hold water. A significant portion of this school is painting about painting.

  12. These don't Look nothing a like to real blood patterns If someone was murdered. I would prob think that a 4 year old broke in and drew all over my walls with a crayon.

  13. I worked at Tate Modern as an art handler for a bit. To get these works out of the room & into their travel frames, we had to put them on blankets, lean them over & slide them out of the doorway at an angle.

  14. Yeah, I did a double take on that. Love his “Leda and the Swan”. Amazing artist. It’s like people are a hundred years behind in their enjoyment of visual art, but up to the second in music. If all you had ever heard was Beethoven and someone played the Beatles,you would be like wtf? And then play some Radiohead. You’d still be behind and scratching your head. That’s what peoples reactions to contemporary art are like.

  15. AND WITH BLOCKCHAIN TECHNOLOGY WE CAN DEMOCRATIZE THE MONEY LAUNDERING. PLS BRO... BUY MY NFT BRO... I PROMISE ITS A SOLID STORE OF VALUE BRO...

  16. Yup look into "freeports" most of the worlds most "valuable" art is locked away at airports. Just buyers and sellers who can anonymously make deals and hide money.

  17. You might be called a conspiracy theorist for saying that but they’re giving you all the ammo.

  18. Blue chip artwork (high end galleries) can and often be money laundering... AND the artwork can be beautiful and meaningful. I mean it's not an either/or.

  19. My art teacher's friend sold an art with 100 usd and 5 to 6 years later they found it in a gallery with a price of 10k usd. Buyer was already determined.

  20. And a lot of them are forgeries, not that the originals are real works of art. It's not hard to imitate the style of some fraud who just threw paint at a canvas.

  21. I'm no expert in money laundering, but why would they buy a canvas instead of a private jet or private island? At least that way they get something cool out of it

  22. When it comes to modern art, there’s always the group of people that look at it and say… “Well I can do that”. Yah you probably can, but you didn’t.

  23. Anyone can be a Modern "Artist". You just need to be able to throw paint on a canvas and convince stupid rich people that it's special.

  24. Well, yours was trash, his is obviously a critical comment on brutal International warfare and the universal human incababillity to live in peace.

  25. You’re on the right track. The one exception is that the art market is actually quite regulated when it comes to money laundering, and paying in cash is a giant red flag that the vast majority of reputable dealers and auction houses would decline. I work in the art market, and in my experience tax write offs in exchange for donating art to museums is the favored vehicle for wealthy collectors. It’s much easier, it’s legal, AND makes you look like a generous philanthropist. Art-backed loans are also popular, and allow you to leverage your collection to get cash. Not saying money laundering with art doesn’t happen at all, but for most people in today’s market money laundering just invites too much scrutiny and isn’t really worthwhile.

  26. Finally someone who gets it. Art doesn’t gain this value because it’s used to launder money, it’s used to launder money because it gains/retains its value.

  27. Thank you for this. I really don't know much about art, but I love abstract art and enjoy contemporary painting (not everything obviously) more than figurative art. I'm tired of having to explain that no, your 5 yo can't do it and anyway who cares because I like it.

  28. The tin on the foil hats in this bunch are industrial grade. Yucking it up comment after comment, “mY FiVe YEaR OlD iS aRTIste! haRr!”

  29. The paintings that are sold at millions dollar figures and up are not actually valued that highly in the sense that the art’s value isn’t rising because it’s sought by so many. There’s a whole world of tax evasion, charity schemes, and fake appraisals; in reality, the art may in fact be sought by no one.

  30. The art world for the top elite would collapse. But there are artists who make a good living selling paintings and prints at accessible prices. Regular people do value art and will pay a few grand for a great painting, just as they would for other decor. Then the artist sells also high quality prints on it.

  31. My mother in law paints ever since she found out she had breast cancer. She would paint “angry pictures” and you could substitute any of these pictures and put hers in there. Especially the bottom right painting.

  32. I hate how pictures like this get tagged in every subreddit trying to pertain to the subreddit's topic. How is this irl at all... We get it.... Man doodles for a living

  33. I'll blunt with everyone, I think it looks cool. It dont think it's worth millions of dollars tho. As others say, it's probably for money laundering, or at least that's my guess.

  34. This type of art is just a real life version of The Emperor's New Clothes. No one wants to seem stupid so they just go with it and praise it like everyone else.

  35. This has got to be it. God forbid anyone dare question the cultural significance of... this. They clearly just don't get it.

  36. Some of these types of paintings just don’t photograph well. The texture of the canvas and paint can be very complex. There can also be a lot of different shades of similar colors.

  37. How does one become an artist for the rich to launder their money like this? I can’t paint or draw but I reckon I could reproduce these masterpieces or something similar blindfolded drunk and with one hand tied behind my back!

  38. Of course everyone could repreduce something when they're in the same mental state as the original artist...

  39. Painters like Cy Twombly became famous in earlier era, when work like this was considered daring, innovative, and influential. Whether you think you could paint it is irrelevant. The real question is, if you were alive and positioned in the art world at the time, would you have painted it?

  40. And if you question it, you’re told you don’t understand it. You’re made to feel like a goon, and an idiot. But it’s shit. It can look nice as a decorative piece in a home above a couch, but it’s stupid, idiotic crap in a museum. We’re all just told to respect it, like we’re told to respect religion.

  41. No one tells you to respect it “just because”. If someone that thinks this art is stupid and looks terrible would actually take time learning how to paint, and would read the history of art, they’d have a completely different appreciation for the work. People are so laughably confident with their totally uninformed opinions. Unlike religion there are very legitimate reasons for why Cy Twombly’s work is as respected and valuable as it is. His works are truly incredible if you see the best ones in person and have an understanding of what level of skill it takes to actually make something like he did. Anyone shitting on an artist like Twombly doesn’t realize they’re just showing how little they’ve studied art.

  42. I like the art and feel that it’s worth the price. A lot of these comments seem to come from uncultured people.

  43. It’s abstract expressionism. It’s meant to bring out emotion and feeling from within the viewer, as well has have them understand the thoughts and emotions of the painter/sculptor.

  44. Not to sound obnoxious but Cy's compositions are insane. He has an insane sense of balance and peace in his paintings. His paintings are provocative in nature, I mean look at the comment section, everybody fuming. This just adds to his notoriety and fame, which only makes his pictures sell for more. And to address the money laundering accusations. There is a connotation that modern art is the main form in which money is laundered through art. Actually, older rendering is usual the target for money laundering.

  45. We all can produce art but not everyone can be an artist and a true original artist comes around maybe once in a generation. But there's an entire industry built around laundering fake originality like this so that it can be sold to uncultivated millionaires. There's nothing new or profound in these scribbles, Mom was right.

  46. I have a few of these works of art my son did as a kid. I am starting the bidding off at 1,500,000. Better hurry up and get them.

  47. I was 6 years old once and had a terrible inner ear infection. My parents put me down to sleep and at some point I got up and decided to draw a mural with a forest green crayon 🖍 over the entire wall adjacent to my bed.. Short story, my parents were not able to sell it for 2 million and had to paint over it before we moved 😆. I guess they should’ve tried though based on these images 🤷‍♂️.

  48. duh it's because all you did was draw a forest while this art, true art, shows human suffering and pain, and shows us how to create utopia, it inspires every one of us, it unites every one of us, clearly your mural was nothing like this art

  49. Well, I'll give the artist one thing: I don't think the painting itself is the artistic act. The artwork is the fact that he dares to paint and exhibit something like that as an adult. It shows us how how much we think the art world has to be strict and one-dimensional, we've stopped doing creative, crazy things in the public eye that are not seen as welcome. That's what he's responding to.

  50. Lmfao. That’s pretty pathetic that people actually pay for that. Had crayons to any 5yo and you’ll have the same thing

  51. None of the people here want to learn about art and how drastically it evolved in the last couple of decades. Stuck in the past when painting was just a craft with minimal symbolism.

  52. I don't understand art. I don't comment on it. But since we are here. I hope you shed a light on my stupid brain and explain to me how it's worth in million. Thanks

  53. My guy, literally anyone could make that piece. It takes no skill or talent to randomly scribble some red paint on a canvas.

  54. I’m just these cost that much for money laundering reasons. That’s all “high art” really is, just a way for the Uber rich to launder money and avoid paying taxes.

  55. I’ve always thought expensive art is just a way for rich ppl to transfer money without large fees and delays and government oversights.

  56. I always hate these takes. A lot of artists are really thinking, "kids were on to something" and try to incorporate that freedom into their work. After photography became the dominant form of image capture, painting was freed from being realistic because if one wants realism, a photo is easier, cheaper, and has more fidelity.

  57. Me thinking about people making insane amounts of money, more ill make in a year they make in a month doing Onlyfans, Tiktok, or stupid shit like this while im working makes me suicidal.

  58. Genuine question , what actually makes these valuable ? Is it just that a certain artist is chosen by the mafia for money laundering so all their paintings become valuable or is there people insane enough to pay for these.

  59. I have a conspiracy theory that most high price art is just used to launder money. I like to believe the artists have no idea that the people paying millions for their work are using it this way and really think that people are buying their scribbles and can see the "deeper meaning" in them.

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