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  1. anytime you can avoid battery or solar, you will see a world of difference

  2. Data collected by a fitness app is not protected like health information under the law, making social and location settings, and login credentials, critical for a user to set properly before making these devices part of their daily life.

  3. To be sure, data compromise issues, from criminal hacks to unintended sharing of sensitive user information, can — and have — hit well-known players, including Fitbit, which Google bought in 2021, and Strava.

  4. Wang enlisted in the U.S. Army Reserve in 2004 at age 33. He is now a lieutenant colonel. Wang told The Bee that he was mobilized to the Pentagon from 2007 to 2008 serving in Operation Enduring Freedom. He deployed to Afghanistan from 2011 to 2012 for what was supposed to be a 400-day tour, but it was cut short near the end. “We were losing something like 1.7 persons per day,” Wang said. “You can do the math — 365 days. It was tough.” Wang has been employed with the city of Folsom since 2008, and it has continued to be supportive of him even in deployments after that. “I don’t know if every employer is like this, but Folsom has been very supportive of the military,” he said.

  5. Tracey Schaal heads the economic development team for the Sacramento Asian Pacific Chamber of Commerce. She said that tech-based businesses in Folsom could be the reason for the influx of Asian residents in the last decade. “It would make sense that the large concentration has to do with the highly (sophisticated), technology-based companies that have chosen to locate in Folsom,” Schaal said via email. “With the presence of employers such as Intel, PowerSchool, Micron, all of which have significant need for engineering, expertise certainly plays a role.” Chalamcherla also said that technology is a large factor in why the Asian population is growing. He said he got welcome letters from companies in America suggesting he come into the country and help with Y2K.

  6. “I do know, anecdotally, that we see members of the Folsom Asian community, (and) all community members, who are really invested in their city, who participate, who regularly spend time volunteering in our community serving at community service day, helping to volunteer in schools and contributing to that high quality of life that Folsom is known for.”

  7. Tracey Schaal heads the economic development team for the Sacramento Asian Pacific Chamber of Commerce. She said that tech-based businesses in Folsom could be the reason for the influx of Asian residents in the last decade. “It would make sense that the large concentration has to do with the highly (sophisticated), technology-based companies that have chosen to locate in Folsom,” Schaal said via email. “With the presence of employers such as Intel, PowerSchool, Micron, all of which have significant need for engineering, expertise certainly plays a role.” Chalamcherla also said that technology is a large factor in why the Asian population is growing. He said he got welcome letters from companies in America suggesting he come into the country and help with Y2K.

  8. “I do know, anecdotally, that we see members of the Folsom Asian community, (and) all community members, who are really invested in their city, who participate, who regularly spend time volunteering in our community serving at community service day, helping to volunteer in schools and contributing to that high quality of life that Folsom is known for.”

  9. The eventual demise of its DVD-by-mail service has been inevitable since Hastings decided to spin it off from a then-nascent video streaming service in 2011. Back then, Hastings floated the idea of renaming the service as Qwikster — a bungled idea that was so widely ridiculed that it was satirized on “Saturday Night Live.” It finally settled on its current, more prosaic handle, DVD.com. The operation is now based in non-descript office in Fremont, California, located about 20 miles from Netflix’s sleek campus in Los Gatos, California.

  10. “When we started going through all the movies we wanted to see, we realized it was cheaper than paying $5 per movie on some streaming services,” Neumann said. “Plus we have found a lot of old horror movies, and that genre is not really big on streaming.”

  11. The eventual demise of its DVD-by-mail service has been inevitable since Hastings decided to spin it off from a then-nascent video streaming service in 2011. Back then, Hastings floated the idea of renaming the service as Qwikster — a bungled idea that was so widely ridiculed that it was satirized on “Saturday Night Live.” It finally settled on its current, more prosaic handle, DVD.com. The operation is now based in non-descript office in Fremont, California, located about 20 miles from Netflix’s sleek campus in Los Gatos, California.

  12. “When we started going through all the movies we wanted to see, we realized it was cheaper than paying $5 per movie on some streaming services,” Neumann said. “Plus we have found a lot of old horror movies, and that genre is not really big on streaming.”

  13. The eventual demise of its DVD-by-mail service has been inevitable since Hastings decided to spin it off from a then-nascent video streaming service in 2011. Back then, Hastings floated the idea of renaming the service as Qwikster — a bungled idea that was so widely ridiculed that it was satirized on “Saturday Night Live.” It finally settled on its current, more prosaic handle, DVD.com. The operation is now based in non-descript office in Fremont, California, located about 20 miles from Netflix’s sleek campus in Los Gatos, California.

  14. “When we started going through all the movies we wanted to see, we realized it was cheaper than paying $5 per movie on some streaming services,” Neumann said. “Plus we have found a lot of old horror movies, and that genre is not really big on streaming.”

  15. The eventual demise of its DVD-by-mail service has been inevitable since Hastings decided to spin it off from a then-nascent video streaming service in 2011. Back then, Hastings floated the idea of renaming the service as Qwikster — a bungled idea that was so widely ridiculed that it was satirized on “Saturday Night Live.” It finally settled on its current, more prosaic handle, DVD.com. The operation is now based in non-descript office in Fremont, California, located about 20 miles from Netflix’s sleek campus in Los Gatos, California.

  16. “When we started going through all the movies we wanted to see, we realized it was cheaper than paying $5 per movie on some streaming services,” Neumann said. “Plus we have found a lot of old horror movies, and that genre is not really big on streaming.”

  17. “When we started going through all the movies we wanted to see, we realized it was cheaper than paying $5 per movie on some streaming services,” Neumann said. “Plus we have found a lot of old horror movies, and that genre is not really big on streaming.”

  18. How errors by coroners and forensic pathologists have allowed potentially guilty perpetrators to go free and the innocent to be accused of crimes they did not commit.

  19. When working at a Japanese company or doing a part-time job at a Japanese convenience store or restaurant, a useful Japanese word to remember is “how to call your boss.” In Japan, it is common to refer to your boss at work by his or her job title rather than by name. What kinds of positions are there in Japanese companies and workplaces? Let's keep this in mind so that you won't have any trouble when working in Japan.

  20. It looks like this is a translation or transcription request, so I've automatically removed your post. Please post to

  21. When working at a Japanese company or doing a part-time job at a Japanese convenience store or restaurant, a useful Japanese word to remember is “how to call your boss.” In Japan, it is common to refer to your boss at work by his or her job title rather than by name. What kinds of positions are there in Japanese companies and workplaces? Let's keep this in mind so that you won't have any trouble when working in Japan.

  22. In a series of tweets, Loder claimed they had seen the data stolen in the alleged breach and spoken to potential victims of the breach, who had confirmed that the breached data was “accurate”.

  23. In a series of tweets, Loder claimed they had seen the data stolen in the alleged breach and spoken to potential victims of the breach, who had confirmed that the breached data was “accurate”.

  24. In a series of tweets, Loder claimed they had seen the data stolen in the alleged breach and spoken to potential victims of the breach, who had confirmed that the breached data was “accurate”.

  25. In a series of tweets, Loder claimed they had seen the data stolen in the alleged breach and spoken to potential victims of the breach, who had confirmed that the breached data was “accurate”.

  26. Pi-Hole is configured to start automatically when the host device boots up. If it's on a Pi, and the Pi is off, just remove the power cable then plug it in again. That will boot the device and Pi-Hole will start.

  27. right next to the red power off button in the web admin interface is a Reboot button as an alternative to removing the power cable

  28. Back in 2015, when I started covering climate change, climate war meant one thing. At the time, if someone said that climate change posed a threat to the world order, you would assume they were talking about the direct impacts of warming, or its second-order consequences. Analysts and scholars worried over scenarios in which unprecedented droughts or city-destroying floods would prompt mass migrations, destabilizing the rich world or giving rise to far-right nationalism. Or they worried that a global famine could send food prices surging, triggering old-fashioned resource wars. Or they fretted over social science showing that weather fluctuations could lead to revolutions and civil wars.

  29. Back in 2015, when I started covering climate change, climate war meant one thing. At the time, if someone said that climate change posed a threat to the world order, you would assume they were talking about the direct impacts of warming, or its second-order consequences. Analysts and scholars worried over scenarios in which unprecedented droughts or city-destroying floods would prompt mass migrations, destabilizing the rich world or giving rise to far-right nationalism. Or they worried that a global famine could send food prices surging, triggering old-fashioned resource wars. Or they fretted over social science showing that weather fluctuations could lead to revolutions and civil wars.

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